Rethinking the Role of Unions

Rethinking the Role of Unions–

The time has come where unions and business can no longer remain operational adversaries.

The goal is to work together to keep and maintain the best workforce and do it by culling out workers that are not psychologically suited for the jobs they are in, especially those individual police and corrections workers, that are non-productive non-reliable workers and non-team players.

Remaining workers should be rewarded with training, profit sharing, positive work environments, promotions, full benefit packages, and a fair base salary/wage.

If CEO’s get bonuses and profit sharing then all employees should get bonuses and profit sharing. Union dues would still be paid.

Unions need to serve the workers that are not well suited for their current jobs by helping  them learn new job skills and finding them new jobs where they can excel.

There was a time when unions needed to exercise political influence.  Workers whose formal education ended at high school and mostly performed manual work, typically did not acquire the abstract thinking required to appreciate complex, pluralistic solutions to political problems.  Labor unions tended to inculcate civic virtues in its members, pushing them to think and vote in a more enlightened way.

Times have changed. Today, unions no longer represent the large number of people that need enlightened thinking.  In the post-World War II era, one in three American workers belonged to a union; now it’s down to one in 10. In terms of representing the traditional working class, the number is even smaller, since a large and growing share of union members consists of public sector employees with college degrees (like teachers).

In a study of 16 European nations, the political scientists Christoph Arndt and Line Rennwald found that in general employees covered by collective bargaining agreements feel less threatened by the social changes that agitate far-right ideologues. (It is not an accident of history that Hitler abolished German trade unions as part of his consolidation of power, or that farmers and small business owners were more sympathetic to the Nazi cause than were industrial workers reared on unionism.)

In 2014, 14.6% of the 189 million people working in the United States were members of a union. 7.2 million employees in the public sector belonged to a union, compared with 7.4 million workers in the private sector. The union membership rate for public-sector workers (35.7 percent) was substantially higher than the rate for private-sector workers (6.6 percent).

Within the public sector, the union membership rate was highest for local government (41.9 percent), which includes employees in heavily unionized occupations, such as teachers, police officers, and firefighters. In the private sector, industries with high unionization rates included utilities (22.3 percent), transportation and warehousing (19.6 percent), telecommunications (14.8 percent), and construction (13.9 percent).