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Philosophy | Politics | Religion

Month: February 2017

Morals–Short and Sweet One-Liners

Harvey Mackay:  “Occasionally I compile a list of my favorite morals from the past couple of years.  Be my guest to share them!”  Considered them shared.  Thanks.

  • Whatever you’re selling, you’re selling yourself first.
  • Don’t presume what you assume is correct.
  • If you live by a great value system, your life will have great value.
  • Accountability is the ability to accept responsibility.
  • You are only as happy as you decide to be.
  • To be a standout, you must stand for only your best.
  • Some of the best lessons we ever learned, we learned from our mistakes and failures.
  • A sense of humor is almost as important as our other five senses.
  • Be respectful or be regretful.
  • Don’t let excess stress get in the way of extreme success.
  • Teamwork divides the task and multiplies the success.
  • Even if you can’t achieve perfection, you should never stop trying.
  • Unhappiness always seeks to get.  Happiness always seeks to give.
  • If you want to have the time of your life, make the most of your minutes.
  • Great brainstorms should produce plenty of en-lightning!
  • If you are persistent, you will get it.  If you are consistent, you will keep it.
  • Clean up your act, or be prepared to clean out your desk.
  • Your job is always to make someone else’s job easier.
  • You can’t buy confidence, but you can sell it!
  • Parents teach lessons even when they think no one is watching.
  • You are only one question away from success, if it’s the right question.
  • Negotiation is not just about winning, it’s about win-win.
  • A little hiccup won’t end your career, but be careful not to let it choke you.
  • Confidence is keeping your chin up.  Overconfidence is sticking your neck out.
  • Optimists are people who make the best of it when they get the worst of it.
  • Persuasion is an art.  The tongue can paint what the eye can’t see.
  • Talk is cheap, but misunderstandings can be costly.
  • Let curiosity turn “I don’t know” into “I want to find out.”
  • The biggest mistake you can make is pretending that you didn’t make one.
  • When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at often change.
  • When you talk to yourself, make sure you listen carefully.
  • Don’t let your fears get in your head – get ahead of them.
  • Take control of your attitude before it takes control of you.
  • Don’t worry about what you could do if you lived your life over; get busy with what’s left.
  • A little spark can lead to a blazing success.
  • You don’t have to uproot the whole tree to turn over a new leaf.
  • Vision without action is a daydream.  Action without vision is a nightmare.
  • Optimal customer service is not optional.
  • Don’t let your mood turn into your doom.
  • The hardest sale you’ll ever make is to yourself.  But once you’re convinced you can do it, you can.
  • When life tests your mettle, nothing succeeds like an iron will.
  • Solving employee turnover is easier when they own a piece of the pie.
  • Selling isn’t rocket science – it’s people science.
  • Humor is more than funny business.
  • The friendships you cultivate will help you grow.
  • It’s just as easy to look for the good things in life as the bad.
  • Make your stumbling blocks your stepping stones.
  • Admitting your own weaknesses is a sign of strength.
  • Hope is what allows us to remember yesterday’s disappointments and still look forward to tomorrow.

Brain Waves, Criminality, Neurofeedback, Diet, Self-Esteem

A growing body of research indicates that ADHD kids are far more likely to become criminals, thrill seekers, successful or bankrupt risk obsessive entrepreneurs.  Because of slower than normal waves in the prefrontal cortex, the front of the brain cannot communicate effectively with the midbrain and properly regulate emotions in everyday life.

Brain waves can be measured and a determination can be made if a brain is balanced.  Data is available to determine who are most likely to commit crimes once released from prison based on characteristics not tied to brain waves.  Why not match brainwave data with characteristics data? There are proven methods to balance brainwaves.  The link tied to “Brain waves can be measured” goes to Brain State Technologies.  The link tied to “Data is available” goes to a transcript of Anne Milgram: How Can Smarter Statistics Help Us Fight Crime?

Damage to the cortex from accident, physical abuse, sports, genetics, oxygen deprivation at birth, or drinking by the mother apparently causes slower than normal waves in the front of the brain and the inability to engage the other systems.

Because the brain’s internal communication system in people with slow wave activity in the frontal lobes is sluggish, incoming messages need to be more sensational than normal to achieve the same level of stimulation.

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